ayrdaomei: ([Misc] a few of my favorite things)
([personal profile] ayrdaomei Apr. 8th, 2009 10:06 am)
I volunteered to read to 6th graders and 8th graders next Thursday (for National Library Week, I believe, since schools were closed here during Read Across America). The organizer suggested that I might want to read to the kids from a book that was a favorite of mine when I was their age. But when I was that age, I was reading Dean Koontz and Star Trek/Alien Nation titles. And while I loved that stuff, I don't know if I want to try it on kids today for a read aloud program.

While I'm considering my options, I'm open to any ideas you all might have about book choices. What were you all into in middle school?

Oh, and I'm a little late on this, so I'll just wish you all a Happy Opening Week :D

From: [identity profile] scornedsaint.livejournal.com


This sounds so great! I kind of wish I could participate. Let us know how it goes?

I actually just finished rereading one of my favorite middle-school books, Bloomability by Sharon Creech, about a disadvantaged girl who ends up going to a school in Switzerland after her uncle becomes the headmaster. It's not as cheesy as I just made it sound, and it's very inspiring and sweet.

I think everything else I read at that age was crap and/or more "advanced". You might want to ask the organizer about Markus Zusak and either I am the Messenger or the Book Thief. Both are technically YA but they're very intense. Coraline might also be a good one since the movie just came out and they've probably heard of it.

(What you should do is read aloud from Angus, Thongs, and Full-Frontal Snogging, complete with exaggerated British accent)

From: [identity profile] ayrdaomei.livejournal.com


Let us know how it goes?

**laughs** Sure.

Thanks for the recs! I actually picked up The Book Thief in the library a couple of months ago, and I remember thinking it sounded really interesting, but I put it off to another day.

(What you should do is read aloud from Angus, Thongs, and Full-Frontal Snogging, complete with exaggerated British accent)

Snerk. I think I'll save that for next time. Want to make a good first impression, don't you know :P

From: [identity profile] schnaucl.livejournal.com


Good for you! I'm like you though, I was reading stuff well above the typical 6th and 8th grader. And I was into genre stuff.

I have the Book Thief too, also unread.

I suppose there's always Twilight if you can keep a straight face, which, from what I've heard about it, may not be possible.

For 8th grade I'm a really big fan of World War Z. It's written amazingly well and each individual piece is relatively short. Everyone I know who has read it has loved it, even if they weren't into zombies. Really, it's amazing.

From: [identity profile] scornedsaint.livejournal.com


I suppose there's always Twilight if you can keep a straight face, which, from what I've heard about it, may not be possible.

OMG, PLEASE DO A DRAMATIC READING OF TWILIGHT. I will drive up to see that shit.

From: [identity profile] schnaucl.livejournal.com


OMG, PLEASE DO A DRAMATIC READING OF TWILIGHT. I will drive up to see that shit.

And podcast it for me! I can just see you reading about the vampires that sparkle.

From: [identity profile] schnaucl.livejournal.com


ETA: World War Z is not a "young adult book" just FYI.

From: [identity profile] johnnybvo.livejournal.com


A horror short story should keep the interest of the 8th graders. King has some stuff that I think would work well in his collections, like his short story The Boogeyman in Nightshift.

For the 6th graders, fuck up their world view with some original Grimm's. "Oh you thought Snow White was all daisies and daffodils? How about she was seven, seven I say, when the Prince bought her, bought her I say, seemingly dead body. Now children, what do you think his intentions were? Hmmm?" Fuck 'em up real good.

From: [identity profile] ayrdaomei.livejournal.com


I'm not trying to scar little children, thanks :P I'll see if my local library has Nightshift - thanks for the rec!

From: [identity profile] bisquickgoddess.livejournal.com


I remember reading books like Where the Red Fern Grows, The Giver, and To Kill a Mockingbird during my pre-teen years. Honestly, I think you should go with something you can finish while you are there. Kids have short attention spans and will appreciate it more. To that end, I suggest short stories. Edgar Allan Poe is a good choice, especially if you can do dramatic voices, but James Thurber might also be good. You might think about reading a Dr. Suess book, like The Lorax. They'll be old enough to appreciate the message and young enough to like the format.

From: [identity profile] bisquickgoddess.livejournal.com


That's the one I was thinking of! Didn't he also write a story about a mild-mannered man who got his overbearing female coworker fired by acting out of character? What's the name of that story?

From: [identity profile] rickenbacker.livejournal.com


The Catbird Seat

(I had to flip through my Thurber Carnival to find it)

From: [identity profile] ayrdaomei.livejournal.com


I'm not familiar with Thurber, but Bri has a book of his stories, so I'll definitely check him out.

I love The Lorax - and it would be well-timed what with Earth Day right around the corner. Hmmm. Thanks for the recs!

From: [identity profile] aurealis.livejournal.com


I think Laura's idea of going with something you can finish is best, but I don't have anything I could recommend (Poe's The Tell-tale Heart, perhaps?). I can tell you, though, a few titles that my sixth-grader sister has enjoyed based on her having kept/bought the books (filtered for Spanish-only titles, manga and stuff that doesn't look to have a lot of literary value):

Walk Two Moons and Love That Dog by Sharon Creech
Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Patterson
A Solitary Blue by Cynthia Voigt
Coraline by Neil Gaiman
Hattie Big Sky by Kirby Larson
The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo
Hoot by Carl Hiaasen
Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
Out of the dust by Karen Hesse
All the Series of Unfortunate Events books by Lemony Snicket
All Harry Potter
The Spiderwick Chronicles series by Tony DiTerlizzi
Golden Compass, The Amber Spyglass and The Firework-maker's daughter by Philip Pullman
The alchemyst Flamel by Michael Scott.

I remember running across a short stories title about school life when I was looking for books to read to my niece and nephew. It sounded funny, but I can't remember the title ... I think it had something to do with the Lunch Lady. :-P Maybe you can search amazon or ebay for something like that?






From: [identity profile] ayrdaomei.livejournal.com


**laughs** Thanks for the recs! Over the weekend, I asked my cousin's daughter (also in sixth-grade) what she liked, and she gave me some recommendations. I plan to actually take a lunch break tomorrow and go over the library, and see what they have that I might use.
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